8 Commonly Asked Questions Answered about De Quervain Syndrome
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Quick answers about De Quervain’s Syndrome

Quick answers about De Quervain’s Syndrome

commonly asked questions about de quervain's disease

What is De Quervain’s?

De Quervain’s is a condition where the tendons between your thumb and your wrist become inflamed.

What are the symptoms of it?

Symptoms of De Quervain’s include swelling in your thumb and wrist, pain in the area, restrictions in movement, and a squeaking sound when you move your wrist. As the symptoms persist, the pain may move up your forearm and your movement of the area may be limited. 

What causes it?

De Quervain’s is usually caused by repetitive hand motions in activities like typing, knitting, farming, or playing a musical instrument. It is also common in people who suffer from rheumatoid arthritis or have an old hand injury.

Why does it ache and swell up?

Overuse of the area with repetitive hand motions causes the sheath surrounding the tendons to swell and inflame leading to less space for the tendons to move back and forth smoothly. This inflammation leads to achiness and pain.

In what age groups is this condition common?

De Quervain’s can occur in any age group, but most commonly people between the ages of 30 and 50 years old suffer from the condition. 

Are there any health conditions that can contribute to this condition? 

As noted above, individuals who suffer from rheumatoid arthritis are at higher risk for this condition. Also, people who have experienced a hand injury in the past may suffer from De Quervain’s.

Who is most likely to get affected by this condition? 

Women, particularly between the ages of 30 and 50, are most likely to suffer from De Quervain’s. Interestingly, pregnant women may also be more vulnerable likely due to hormones and of course rheumatoid arthritis sufferers.

What is the cure for De Quervain’s? 

If you are affected by this condition, rest for the area is very important. You may benefit from over-the-counter anti-inflammatory drugs, steroid injections, or the De Quervain’s Wand. However, if the condition has progressed unchecked your doctor may suggest surgery.

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