A lot of people would consider surgery for treatment of De Quervain’s Tenosynovitis right off the bat; however, it is essential to fully understand it first and weigh the risks and complications that accompany the process. There may be a safer route that can be taken instead. 

Surgical Treatment for De Quervain’s Tenosynovitis:

Surgery is the most common form of treatment for De Quervain’s Tenosynovitis, but is it the best option?

Procedure:

During the process, local anesthesia is used to numb the affected area. A small incision is made by the surgeon at the base of the thumb, and the band of fascia that runs along the top of the tendons is located. The band of fascia is severed to release it, being careful not to damage the tendons or nerves. The incision is then closed.

Recovery Period:

Though the patient is released on the same day, it can take from six-twelve weeks to recover fully from the condition. During that time, the pain and symptoms may persist, and hand function may not fully return. The affected hand may remain immobile for some time following the surgery, while a splint is worn for support. Engaging in activities that could strain the area like typing, cooking, and writing is not recommended during the recovery period.

Potential Risks:

No surgery is entirely risk-free, and complications are expected in rare cases. Some potential risks may be:

  • Wound Infection may occur at the site.
  • The radial nerve may be damaged.
  • Tendons may be displaced or dislocated.
  • The incision site may experience tenderness or swelling.
  • One tendon may be mistaken for another resulting in continuous entrapment.
  • The incision site may be replaced with a nasty scar.

Surgery provides a permanent solution in serious cases, but given the risks involved, natural cures or home treatment for De Quervain’s Tenosynovitis should also be tried for a safer, non-surgical treatment method.